Blog Post: Mannin’s failed sea-crossing

RSPB Scotland’s Investigation Intelligence Officer Jenni Burrell provides an update on Mannin, the Isle of Man sat-tagged hen harrier.   Monitoring satellite-tagged hen harriers can bring many positives – following an individual bird from the day it was fitted with a transmitter until its first flights away from the nest area, its travels through the UK (and beyond in some cases ) or even hopefully until its own first nesting attempt. Unfortunately, however, it can also bring some negatives. Sadly, here, we report on the death of another of our 2017 birds.  Mannin, along with his sister Grayse, was tagged on the Isle of Man on 3 rd July 2017 by trained & licensed members of the Scottish Raptor Study Group and Manx Ringing Group in partnership with Manx Birdlife. After fledging in July, Mannin explored his home island until 14 th August, when the tag data showed he had departed the island and headed north towards the Galloway coast in SW Scotland. Sadly he never completed this journey, and the data showed that he had gone down in the sea, approximately 5km off the Scottish coast. Mannin and sister Grayse - image by James Leonard   We have not lost one of our tagged birds at sea before, and while we were almost certain he had died, we were unsure if the tag would continue to function or when we would eventually lose track of Mannin, if the voltage in the tag’s battery declined or if his body sank to the bottom of the sea? A few days later, on 24 th August we had our answer. The satellite tag had continued transmitting, and the data showed that Mannin was now located on the shoreline. After a brief search of the area, near Kirkcudbright, my colleagues soon found Mannin’s remains and the tag. As with all recovered birds we submitted his body for examination, at the SRUC Veterinary Laboratory. Their subsequent post mortem report said that there was no evidence of trauma or health problems and that Mannin had eaten a small mammal recently. We’ll never know what caused Mannin to go down in the sea. Maybe he was caught in heavy rain, and with nowhere to land, became waterlogged and was unable to complete the sea crossing? Whatever the cause, it was a sad end to his short life.   Map of Mannin’s movements  Sadly, Grayse has also died, also just a few weeks after fledging. She was recovered on the island on 9 th August after her tag showed that she had died. Her body was examined by ZSL whose interim diagnosis did not implicate human interference as a cause of death. Neil Morris from Manx Birdlife said “Obviously, everyone involved in the project here in the Isle of Man is desperately sad that Grayse and Mannin have perished. Their early demise highlights the vulnerability of young birds learning to fend for themselves once they have fledged the nest. It also underlines the need for a large healthy population that can withstand such losses. “At the same time, it’s wonderful to see Aalin coming through her first year so well, and to get such an insight to her behaviour. We need to know so much more about these wonderful birds of prey in order to formulate ever better conservation strategies. We shall continue the work to study Hen Harriers on the Isle of Man.” Whilst the deaths of both of these birds through natural causes is disappointing, the finding of their bodies and recovery of them and their tags was straightforward. As you would expect, their transmitters continued to provide us with good location data, even after one of them had spent ten days in the sea. This is, however, in marked contrast to the disappearance of “ Calluna ”, whose perfectly-functioning tag’s transmissions ended very abruptly on 12 th August. Her last recorded position was on a grouse moor, a few miles north of Ballater, in the Cairngorms National Park, and her disappearance can rightly be regarded as highly suspicious. Here’s hoping that the ten remaining birds from the Class of 2017 continue to thrive and provide us with many more positive stories. You can follow them here .            

Comment on Meet the Hen Harrier Class of 2017

Good luck to them all. Is this statement on the BBC website about Calluna missing Chris "Scotland remains a stronghold for the birds, with 80% of the UK population. Current estimates suggest there are about 600 breeding pairs across the UK."

Blog Post: Meet the Hen Harrier Class of 2017

RSPB Scotland’s Investigations Intelligence Officer Jenni Burrell introduces the new class. This year the Hen Harrier Life Project website has been improved to provide a more interactive experience for visitors. You can choose to look at individual birds, track their journey and look at any points of interests that appear. The profiles of twelve of this year’s satellite-tag hen harriers are now online and what a brilliant bunch they are. Take a look on the website to learn more about their stories and meet: Calluna (image by RSPB) Eric (image by Alan Leitch) Heather  (i mage by Brian Etheridge)   Lia  (i mage by Guy Anderson)   Mairie  (i mage by Paul Howarth)   Mannin  (i mage by James Leonard)   Manu  (image by Tim Jones)   Rannoch  (i mage by Brian Etheridge)     Saorsa (i mage by Brian Etheridge)   Skylar  (image by RSPB)     Sirius  (image by RSPB)     Tony  (i mage by Dave Anderson)   Sadly Calluna is no longer with us. Calluna’s sat tag transmissions abruptly ended on 12 th August, with no further data transmitted. Her last recorded position was on a grouse moor a few miles north of Ballater, in the Cairngorms National Park - Jeff Knott has written this blog about her. You’ll be able to follow the progress of the other birds as we map their movements online. To protect sensitive breeding sites, maps of their movements will only be added as soon as they’ve dispersed away from their nest sites. We have already been able to share the first movements of Heather, Eric, Skylar, Sirius and Saorsa who have already proved to be adventurous and spread their wings. We’ll add the remaining birds as soon as we can.  You may notice that only one of last year’s birds is back on the website. After a very successful breeding season, DeeCee has moved away from the nest site so we are able to share her movements again. Don’t worry, the other four are safe and well, but have yet to move away from breeding areas. We will keep you updated and will begin to map their movements in due course. In the meantime, see what they have been up to in a previous blog . It’s going to be an exciting year following these birds and seeing what they get up to and we can’t wait to share it with you.  

Comment on Calluna has disappeared!

Whilst I do hope that no more hen harriers are lost like Calluna, it is more realistic to hope that enough hen harriers will be tagged to give an estimate of the first and subsequent year losses to persecution just as has happened with golden eagles. My expectation that

Comment on Calluna has disappeared!

I'm afraid that anyone questioning the reliability of satellite tags needs to pay attention to one fact - the location where the tracking ceased.  Grouse moors relentlessly raise their ugly heads when this question is asked.  The truth is that Calluna will be far from the last bird to be lost unless something drastic is done to consign the hideous world of driven grouse shooting into history.

Blog Post: Calluna has disappeared!

I’m very sad to have to report that one of the hen harrier’s satellite tagged as part of the LIFE project this year, has already disappeared. “Calluna”, a female harrier, was tagged this summer at a nest on the National Trust for Scotland’s Mar Lodge estate, near Braemar. We were monitoring her transmitter’s data which showed that she fledged from the nest in July. She left the area in early August, and gradually headed east over the Deeside moors. However, while the tag data showed it to be working perfectly, transmissions abruptly ended on 12 th August, with no further data transmitted. Calluna’s last recorded position was on a grouse moor a few miles north of Ballater, in the Cairngorms National Park. For regular followers of our hen harriers, this will be a depressingly familiar story. I’m sure some will focus on the date transmissions ended – the 12 th August, the traditional start of the grouse shooting season. Bluntly, the date isn’t really the point. The disappearance of one of our hen harriers is a major loss whenever it occurs. While we will likely never know for certain what happened to Calluna, it fits a pattern of disappearances where perfectly functioning tags suddenly stop transmitting and are never recovered. She joins the growing list of satellite-tagged birds of prey that have disappeared, in highly suspicious circumstances, almost exclusively in areas intensively managed for grouse shooting. The transmitters we use are incredibly reliable and the sudden halt in data being received from it, with no hint of a malfunction, is very concerning. I started working on hen harriers for the RSPB 10 years ago next month. One of the first documents I helped produce discusses how terrible it was that there were only 14 successful hen harrier nests in the whole of England that year. This year there were three. It’s appalling to me now that those historic 14 successful nests in one year would be treated like a breeding bonanza today! But despite that lack of progress and the continued disappearance of hen harriers like Calluna, I remain optimistic. More people know more about the plight of these amazing birds than ever before. In Scotland the Cabinet Secretary for the Environment has commissioned an independent group to look at how grouse moors can be managed sustainably and within the law. And there are still lots of other young hen harriers out there with satellite tags on, thanks to the LIFE project. The team has fitted a significant number this year, with the very welcome help from landowners, including the National Trust for Scotland, who value these magnificent birds breeding on their property. You will be able to follow the trials and tribulations of some of those birds very soon. Check back here for more news. These tags help us not only better understand and protect hen harrier, but also bring new voices into the fight to save them. Hopefully no more of our hen harriers go the way of Calluna. If anyone has any information about the disappearance of Calluna we urge them to contact Police Scotland as quickly as possible.

Blog Post: Hen Harrier Day 2017 – in pictures

Here are a selection of photos from last weekend's Hen Harrier Day events at RSPB Arne, RSPB Rainham Marshes, Sheffield, Boat of Garten and Vane Farm Tayside. Hen Harrier Day South - RSPB Arne - (photos by Terry Bagley) Hen Harrier Day Highlands - Boat of Garten (photos by Guy Shorrock)       Hen Harrier Day Sheffield       Hen Harrier Day - RSPB Rainham Marshes       Hen Harrier Day - Vane Farm, Tayside (photos Guy Shorrock)  

Comment on Hen harrier breeding numbers in England 2017

Sorry Blanaid, but as we have previously discussed, the RSPB must accept some responsibility for this result. Far too much time and patience has been shown by the RSPB towards the law-breakers, who simply take advantage of the weak position of the RSPB on this issue. I appreciate many people at the RSPB are trying hard and doing the right things, but quite simply the law-breakers are laughing at the stance of the RSPB and many of your members are getting increasingly frustrated.It really is time for concerted, determined, effective action to protect these glorious birds.

Blog Post: Hen harrier breeding numbers in England 2017

It’s the question to which everyone wants the answer – how many hen harriers bred in England this year? Answer: three successful nests, from a total of seven attempts, producing 10 fledged young. Today, the Northumberland Hen Harrier Protection Partnership* have announced that five of this year’s nests, including the three successes, were under their watch, with four of these occurring on land managed by the Forestry Commission.  This is the third year in a row that hen harriers have bred successfully at this site, after eight fledged from two nests in 2015, and six from two nests in 2016, clearly marking Northumberland out as the new stronghold for hen harriers in England. One of this year's hen harrier nests in Northumberland (Image: RSPB) Representing the Partnership, Andrew Miller of the National Park said, “Hen harriers are still facing an uphill battle to re-establish themselves in the uplands of England. However with the positive support of all our partners including key landowners, ten young birds have successfully fledged. Working together and using the latest scientific techniques is also increasing our knowledge of this amazing species. We will continue to monitor our birds throughout the year and hope that this year’s youngsters will stay safe and be as successful as last year’s Finn ”  This nesting success comes as a desperately needed lifeline for a breeding population currently hanging by a thread in England. The country’s former stronghold for hen harriers, the Forest of Bowland (a Special Protection Area (SPA) designated for 13 breeding pairs of these threatened birds, and an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty which has the hen harrier as its logo), hasn’t had a successful nest since 2015. Last year, the only other SPA designated for breeding hen harriers in England, the North Pennine Moors (designated for 11 pairs), experienced its first breeding success in a full decade after one chick fledged from a nest on the RSPB Geltsdale reserve in Cumbria. Sadly, the success wasn’t repeated this year - despite an abundance of food and habitat, the birds simply weren’t around. Bonny, the sole hen harrier chick to fledge from our Geltsdale reserve in the North Pennine Moors SPA in 2016 (Image: Mark Thomas) There were, however, two nesting attempts in the North Pennines just outside the SPA this year, both in the Cumbrian part of the Yorkshire Dales National Park. Unfortunately, despite sensitive monitoring and protection by National Park Authority staff and volunteers and Natural England with full support from the landowners, neither was successful. One of the attempts was in a gap in a forest plantation, while the other was in a thick rush bed, both on private land, adjacent to a managed grouse moor. In a polygamous set-up with one adult male attending to two females (one adult, one immature), both nests are believed to have failed naturally – one in the very early stages of the attempt and the other due to suspected fox predation while still on eggs.  David Butterworth, CEO Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority said, “Given it had been ten years since Hen Harriers nested in the National Park, the presence of these birds was extremely welcome.  It was, therefore, incredibly disappointing that the nesting attempts failed, despite the best efforts of all involved. “The Authority is fully aware of all the issues surrounding Hen Harriers in the uplands, so it was really encouraging that the birds’ presence was welcomed by all stakeholders.  We would like to thank them all for their cooperation during the nesting period.  We hope that the enlightened attitude towards the presence of these birds is the start of a more positive outlook for this species, which will lead to the Hen Harrier returning as a regular breeding species within the Yorkshire Dales National Park”.  Male hen harrier in flight (Image: Andy Hay, rspb-images.com) Of the two failed Northumberland nests, one was also thought to be due to fox predation, while the other was lost to extensive, heavy rainfall when the chicks were at a very vulnerable stage. Natural losses such as these are of course disappointing, but far more concerning this year has been the near total absence of hen harriers from vast swathes of potentially suitable habitat elsewhere in the country. A lone male skydanced to empty skies over United Utilities’ estate in Bowland for six weeks this summer, with never a female in sight, despite an apparent abundance of food including good numbers of voles.  Meanwhile, although short-eared owls enjoyed record breeding success on our Geltsdale reserve following a boom in vole numbers, hen harriers were nowhere to be seen. And sporadic reports of individual birds were all that was to be had from what should be prime hen harrier areas, such as the wider North Pennines, North York Moors, and the Peak District. This puts the 2017 total number of hen harrier nests in England on a par with last year’s three successful nests from four breeding pairs, making it the second year in a row where the hen harrier breeding population in England is no more than 1-2% of the recognised potential ( 300 pairs). Clearly as we’ve seen this year, natural factors such as predation and weather events play a part, however a healthy population should be able to withstand such fluctuations. What is utterly unacceptable is the ongoing illegal killing and disturbance of this protected bird of prey, primarily associated with intensive moorland management for driven grouse shooting. In the last 12 months alone, two hen harriers have been confirmed shot in northern England. First a female hen harrier named Rowan, satellite tagged by Natural England in 2016, was found shot dead in Cumbria last October. Then, in January, an RSPB sat-tagged female, Carroll, was found dead in Northumberland. The post-mortem showed she was in very poor condition and had been suffering from an infectious disease. Disturbingly however, it also revealed two shotgun pellets lodged in her body, indicating she had survived being shot at some earlier point in her life. Of course, if these birds had not been satellite tagged, it’s entirely possible that neither of these crimes would have ever come to light. Radiograph of Carroll, showing two shotgun pellets (Image: Zoological Society of London) Clearly something needs to change, which is why the RSPB is asking for stronger controls, including the introduction of a licensing system to stop the wildlife crime and other damaging practices linked to grouse shooting in its most intensive ‘driven’ form.  We think a fair set of rules could also help put grouse shooting on a sustainable footing, whilst introducing more effective means to deter criminal activity, including in the most serious cases, the removal of their licence to operate. It is good that the overall number of nesting attempts has increased slightly this year, but whichever way you look at it – three successes, or seven attempts – it is nowhere near good enough. This weekend, I’ll be joining hundreds of people attending Hen Harrier Day events across the UK, to say “Hands off our Hen Harriers! “ and calling for safe return of these spectacular skydancers to our moors. I’ll be speaking alongside Natalie Bennett, Mark Avery, and Iolo Williams at the event in Sheffield on Saturday 5 August but there are plenty of others across both Saturday and Sunday for you to choose from, all organised by Birders Against Wildlife Crime. Simply visit henharrierday.org to find out more. See you there! --- * The  Northumberland Hen Harrier Protection Partnership includes the Northumberland National Park Authority, Forestry Commission, RSPB, Natural England, Northumberland Wildlife Trust, Ministry of Defence, Northumbria Police, and Northern England Raptor Forum. For more information on what the RSPB is doing to secure a future for hen harriers in England and beyond, visit www.rspb.org.uk/henharrierlife and follow us on twitter @RSPB_Skydancer .    

Blog Post: Competition: Help us name our hen harriers!

You may remember last month I blogged about our 2016 Perthshire female, DeeCee and her fantastic brood of five healthy chicks (see here ). Well, I’m now delighted to share that all five have fledged successfully from land owned and managed by Forestry Commission Scotland in Argyll – two of them sporting shiny new Hen Harrier LIFE Project satellite tags! Three of DeeCee's five chicks, July 2017 (Image: RSPB) The two eldest and biggest chicks in the brood, one male and one female, were each fitted with the tiny transmitters just days before fledging, by a trained expert, under specialist licence. It will be fascinating to see where they go. Will they follow the same movement patterns of their mum, DeeCee, or will they go their own way entirely? Only time will tell. For now though, we need your help to choose names for them! You have from today until midnight on 3 August to submit your suggestions to our competition website  here . All ideas welcome (yes, even Henny McHenFace but I’m making you zero promises on that one!) and you can submit two entries, so use your entries wisely. Eight of our favourite submitted names will be selected and put to public vote on on  @RSPB_Skydancer . The public voting will run from 7-8 August, and from 9-10 August. The winning two names with the highest number of votes will be announced on this blog on 11 August 2017. See  here  for the terms and conditions. So what are you waiting for? Get those thinking caps on and get suggesting! In the meantime, both our as-yet-nameless young harriers have been sticking tight to their nest site, still dependent on their parents for food as they get used to their wings and gradually practice hunting for themselves. Slowly but surely though, they’re starting to venture a little bit further each day and my guess is it won’t be long before one of them makes the leap and roosts away from its nest for the very first time. Details of our full Class of 2017 will be online from the start of September, however to protect sensitive breeding sites, maps of their movements will only be added as soon as they’ve dispersed away from their nest sites. With some of the birds this might be immediately, while others may hang about home until the start of November. So if you don’t see the maps straight away, don’t panic - if anything happens to any of them, we’ll let you know! Whatever else, I have a sneaking suspicion these two are going to be the stars of the show. --- If you want to do more for hen harriers, or even simply find out more, why not join hundreds of people around the country at a Hen Harrier Day event this weekend? I'll be speaking at the event in Sheffield on Saturday 5 August, but there are plenty more to choose from, across England, Scotland, and Northern Ireland. Simply visit henharrierday.org to find the one nearest to you. #HHday2017 #StopKillingHenHarriers  To find out more about the Hen Harrier LIFE Project, visit our website at www.rspb.org.uk/henharrierlife or follow us on Twitter @RSPB_Skydancer  

Blog Post: Exciting times: Hen harriers the next generation

We've received more brilliant news this week - in her first ever breeding attempt, our Northumberland female, Finn, is successfully rearing one chick at her nest in Southwest Scotland! The discovery was made by specially trained and licensed staff following up on Finn's welfare.  Finn's offspring - a single, large but still downy chick hidden in the heather. (Image: RSPB)  Hen harriers don't always breed in their first year, in fact historical records estimate only between 8-30% of first year birds make the attempt. And often when they do, the risk of failure is greater due to inexperience or laying infertile eggs. So although a single chick may not seem like much, for our young Finn, it's a fantastic achievement.  All being well, we expect that Finn's chick will fledge in the next 7-10 days.  Finn herself was named after teenage conservationist and blogger, Findlay Wilde, who together with energy company, Ecotricity, sponsored Finn's tag. As you can imagine, he was utterly delighted to hear the news. Findlay said: "I'm delighted to be able to shout from the roof tops about Finn's first successful breeding attempt.  She has proven to be a very determined bird since fledging last year.  Successes like this are treasures for everyone to enjoy and talk about, as silence will not protect these amazing birds of prey. Hen harriers are on an incredibly difficult journey, just like the one Finn's chick is about to set off on. There needs to be vision and foresight to ensure that more birds like Finn get the opportunity of life" Finn and her three siblings in their nest in Northumberland, July 2016. (Image: Martin Davison) Andrew Miller of the Northumberland National Park, heads up the Northumberland Hen Harrier Protection Partnership*, which watched over Finn and her siblings as chicks last year. Andrew said, "It's wonderful news and so gratifying to see one of our birds not only surviving well but contributing to the next generation of hen harriers. It's been fascinating to watch her progress and this is further proof that hen harriers in England and Scotland aren't isolated from one another. I wish her and her chick well and have my fingers crossed for plenty more successful breeding seasons to come."  It's absolutely true that what happens on one side of the border has the potential to influence the population as a whole. That's why this year, the Hen Harrier LIFE Project has been fitting satellite tags to more hen harrier chicks, across a wider geographical range than ever before. More on that to be announced in the coming weeks, so watch this space... --- *the Northumberland Hen Harrier Protection Partnership includes Northumberland National Park, Forestry Commission, Natural England, Northumberland Wildlife Trust, RSPB, MoD, Northumbria Police, and the Northern England Raptor Forum (NERF).  For more information about the Hen Harrier LIFE Project, visit www.rspb.org.uk/henharrierlife,  and follow us on twitter @RSPB_Skydancer .   

Blog Post: Guest Blog: Stunning hen harrier chase on Isle of Man

Peter Christian is a birdwatcher and photographer with a keen eye for detail. Here, he describes how he was lucky enough to capture an incredible photographic series of a hen harrier in pursuit of a meadow pipit, providing a rarely glimpsed view into lives of these extraordinary birds. All photographs are kindly reproduced with Peter's permission and remain his copyright.  As a keen birdwatcher and hobby photographer on the Isle of Man, it's thankfully not too uncommon to encounter Hen Harriers. On a walk on an upland track recently however, I witnessed something I've never seen before.  Initially distant in the valley below I spotted the unmistakable presence of a male Hen Harrier. A striking bird to say the least. What's more, it was hunting a Meadow Pipit - wow!  They looked to be heading my way, so I grabbed the camera and tried to capture something of it.  I was surprised at the sheer agility and perseverance of the Harrier in its efforts to catch the Meadow Pipit. At one moment they were quite close to me but I found it almost impossible to focus the big telephoto lens on them. As they climbed and dived moving farther away I persevered and got a burst of frames away.  I hoped these would at least capture something of this life and death pursuit.  As they disappeared further out of sight I put the lens down and reflected on something special. Then, as photographers usually do, I flicked through the images and hoped I'd at least have one or two that weren't blurry! To my surprise I'd actually managed to capture something of it. Not the best shots I've ever taken, but a Hen Harrier hunting, it doesn't get much better.  I have a feeling that the Pipit escaped that day, it looked like it found cover, but I'll never know for sure.  For more fantastic photography, follow Peter on Twitter    @manxmannin . Such encounters are increasingly rare on mainland Britain, where last year’s National Hen Harrier Survey revealed a 14% population decline since 2010. By contrast the Isle of Man population of this threatened bird appears to have been holding steady over the last few years. Neil Morris of Manx Birdlife, explains the history and importance of hen harriers to the Isle of Man. In 1977, the first Hen Harriers bred on the Isle of Man in Glen Rushen plantation. Numbers climbed to a possible all time high of 51 pairs in 1998. More recently, breeding censuses indicate the population has fallen from this peak to a (perhaps) stable 30 'nesting attempts' per annum. This represents approximately one nest per 7.4 sq miles, which compares to just four pairs in the whole England (50,000 sq miles compared to the island's 221 sq miles). Clearly, Hen Harriers like the Isle of Man; and the island's community likes its Hen Harriers! In a recent fundraising drive through the Groundwork Trust and Tesco's 'Bags of help' scheme, Manx BirdLife received 57,000 'votes' to support Hen Harriers. The second-placed charitable cause received 37,000 votes. But we must not be complacent. Research is needed to understand exactly why the island offers such a stronghold for the species, and to ensure the potential risks to its continued fortunes are understood. It's a salutary thought that if the brood management plan proposed by Natural England were implemented in the Isle of Man, then we would be required to remove up to 27 out of our 30 nests (i.e. 90%). The island’s continued interest in its birds and other wildlife is crucial to their protection. Peter’s fantastic series of images will do much to help keep Hen Harriers uppermost in the community’s hearts and minds. Following on from the successful satellite tagging of young Manx female, Aalin, last year, two more hen harrier chicks have been tagged on the Isle of Man this summer and we can’t wait to share their journeys with you. Keep watching this space for further updates and be sure to follow us online at www.rspb.org.uk/henharrierlife or on Twitter @RSPB_Skydancer .  

Blog Post: When the Sun Shines on a Moorland Field Trip

What a busy few weeks it has been! Darting around the country, playing with puppets, constructing moorlands from playdough, refereeing Skydance Olympic competitions... Don’t get me wrong, I’m not complaining. Popping into primary schools to deliver hen harrier workshops and assemblies is a lot of fun. Occasionally, though, I feel especially lucky to have my job. I’m speaking about those days when the sun shines on a moorland field trip.     Towards the end of May the primary 4/5 class from Finzean School joined me in an upland area of the Forest of Birse in Aberdeenshire to find out more about the hen harrier and the moorland as a habitat after my visit to their primary school earlier in the month. And what an excellent day it was too. We scoured the skies with our binoculars, and the moorland vegetation below for invertebrate life and interesting plant species...     ... and made recordings of a variety of living creatures with varying numbers of legs, investigating the unusual that we encountered along the way, including animal skulls and insect cocoons...       We enjoyed creating some mini moorlands to take home...       ... and concocted moorland healing potions with magical properties in an attempt to help the hen harrier thrive in this habitat again. Sometimes going about my day just doesn’t feel like work at all! The only thing that could have added to the trip would have been to see the hen harrier above, going about it’s day too.   To find out more about our work to raise awareness and secure a future for hen harriers in our hills, visit www.rspb.org.uk/henharrierlife or follow us on twitter @RSPB_Skydancer .      

Blog Post: Happy hen harrier family

Great news for a Friday - a recent routine check of DeeCee's nest in Argyll, carried out by RSPB staff under full appropriate licences, has revealed a healthy brood of five chicks! Hen harrier DeeCee's healthy brood of five chicks. Can you spot the tiny youngest in the middle?  You'll need to look really closely to spot them all. Like many birds of prey, hen harriers lay their eggs a day at a time and they hatch consecutively in the order in which they were laid. This means that the eldest of DeeCee's chicks has at least a five day's start on the youngest, and being bigger, is able to gobble up the lion's share of the food that the adult male brings to the nest. Field voles are a vital food source for hen harriers throughout the breeding season but numbers of voles naturally vary widely from year to year, often showing what's known as boom and bust cycles. This size difference in the chicks is nature's way of ensuring that even in years of few voles when there's a shortage of food, the eldest chicks have a good chance of surviving and fledging successfully.  Fortunately, you'll be pleased to hear that DeeCee has very sensibly chosen to nest in an area which, at the time of the visit, seemed bursting with voles and small birds like meadow pipits, so with any luck, there'll be plenty of food to sustain all five of her young brood.  DeeCee as a newly satellite-tagged chick alongside her siblings. (Image: Brian Etheridge)  All being well and with permission from the landowner, we'll be returning in a few short weeks to fit the eldest chick with a satellite tag to match its mum's. It will be fascinating to see if this young harrier follows in the footsteps of its parent or whether it does something different entirely. Watch this space...!  For more information about the Hen Harrier LIFE Project, visit www.rspb.org.uk/henharrierlife or follow us on twitter @RSPB_Skydancer

Comment on Hen harrier Class of 2016: an update

I'm so pleased that some of the birds are still with us. Lets also hope that the recent events in Scotland will reduce the persecution there, but be prepared for that not to happen. Can I also ask those in Scotland to write to their MSPs to ensure the law is changed to allow  video evidence in court.

Blog Post: Hen harrier Class of 2016: an update

As I sit at my desk with every window in the office open and the sun beating through the glass, it feels as though the year has abandoned any thought of Spring and skipped straight to Summer. Long may it last! It’s also a reminder (as if I needed one) that we are rapidly approaching the thick of the hen harrier breeding season, and my thoughts are naturally with our five remaining satellite-tagged females from 2016. What will these young birds, barely even a year old, make of their first true summer and will they survive to see another autumn? The news of a hen harrier shooting allegedly witnessed in broad daylight only weeks ago, near Leadhills in Southwest Scotland, has done little to calm my nerves. For now however, I am delighted and hugely relieved to say that all five birds are alive and doing well. Not only that but against all the indications of their youth, at least three of our females are now confirmed breeding, with a fourth seemingly not far behind! Harriet – a history-making young bird as one of the first hen harriers in living memory to fledge from the National Trust for Scotland’s Mar Lodge Estate, Harriet spent all winter in the Lake District but come Spring, clearly felt the pull of home. She returned to Mar Lodge briefly in April but has since gone wandering around the East of Scotland. When the data from her tag showed she had started sticking tightly to one area of Perthshire, we sent the team to look for her on the ground and sure enough, she is now sitting on a full clutch of eggs! ( Image: Shaila Rao ) DeeCee – from a private estate in Perthshire, our DeeCee never showed much inclination to leave the familiar ground of the Cairngorms. That was until all of a sudden in April, she started yo-yoing between there and the west coast of Scotland, making day-trips to Jura and Mull and back again. This incredible behaviour serves to show just how far and how quickly hen harriers can travel, and how unpredictable those movements can be. She has now settled somewhere in the middle, in the mainland area of  Argyll & Bute, and once again when our team went to look, they found her sitting on a full clutch of 5 eggs! ( Image: Brian Etheridge ) Finn – our one remaining English bird, Finn left Northumberland very shortly after fledging and has made a steady westward tour of the Scottish Borders, ultimately settling in South Ayrshire for the winter months. Unlike DeeCee and Harriet though, it would seem she didn’t need to travel quite so far to find an attractive breeding site, as in the last couple of weeks, she has been discovered sitting on a nest with eggs in an area of Southwest Scotland! ( Image: Martin Davison ) Aalin – this Manx beauty is proving a source of endless fascination as the first harrier officially to have been recorded leaving the Isle of Man for mainland Britain. She was spotted at a local nature reserve in Warrington in November, before making her way south to spend the winter over an area of farmland in Shropshire. The last of our hen harriers to forsake her wintering grounds this Spring, Aalin has only just recently moved across into North Wales. We wondered if she could be getting ready to make the leap across the water and back to her island home but it seems she may have found a reason to stay... as she’s been spotted dallying with a grey male over some very suitable looking habitat. Will she stay or will she go? Watch this space...! ( Image: Sean Gray ) Wendy – from Coulport MOD on the West Coast of Scotland, Wendy was the most sedentary of all our tagged harriers over winter, making herself very comfortable on the Isle of Mull from October right through until April. Of course she now seems to be making up for lost time and is apparently the only one of our young birds still determined to wander, though still no great distances. Most recently, she has been spending time in an area just to the west of Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park. ( Image: John Simpson ) Normally when people ask me about first-year hen harriers, I’d say they don’t usually breed in their first year but it can certainly happen. Donald Watson, the eminent hen harrier scholar himself, noted proportions of first year hen harriers breeding in a population ranging from 8-30%. However that three, possibly four, out of five of our tagged birds have had the opportunity to breed in their first summer does seem remarkable. Given the sensitivities of the breeding season and the need to protect the locations of both our nesting females and any other nesting hen harriers that may be in the same areas, we have temporarily stopped updating the maps on the Hen Harrier LIFE Project website . I’m sure you can appreciate the need for this and rest assured, you can still get the latest updates from our tagged birds on this blog and on twitter @RSPB_Skydancer . Thanks to generous funding from LUSH cosmetics through the sales of their Skydancer bathbomb, this summer we have plans to fit satellite tags to hen harriers across a wider range of places than ever before – from Wales to Orkney, and as many places in between as possible! If we’ve learned anything so far, it’s that hen harriers travel widely and unpredictably, so if we want to protect them in one area, we need to protect them wherever they may be. I look forward to resuming our usual schedule of updates in the autumn, when with any luck, we’ll have a whole new cohort of young hen harriers ready to share their exciting journeys with you. In the meantime, stay tuned to this blog and twitter - who knows what the next few months will bring?  Watch this space... --- To find out more about the Hen Harrier LIFE Project, visit www.rspb.org.uk/henharrierlife

Blog Post: Guest Blog: Join Bo the hen harrier at Cloudspotting Music and Arts Festival 2017

Originally from London but a resident of Lancashire for 17 years with a love of the surrounding countryside and wildlife, Helen Ficorilli is the Programme Director of the Cloudspotting Music and Arts Festival, which has taken up residence in the Forest of Bowland over the last seven years. Here she tells us why a female hen harrier has this year been taken up as the emblem for this annual event.    Cloudspotting Music and Arts Festival returns to Gisburn Forest within Forest of Bowland AONB for it’s 7 th outing for the last weekend of July.  More pocket sized than boutique, this unique festival has captured the imagination and support of regional and national plaudits which include The Guardian, The Big Issue, Radio 6Music DJs and the high number of returning family audiences.  In a location managed by the Forestry Commission England, Cloudspotting has the support from the FCE and the Arts Council to bring high level quality arts engagement into the forest, an area of traditional low arts representation. Home to some of the most stunning scenery and delicate wildlife habitats in Britain we have always encouraged our audience to explore the surrounding forest and engage with the local wildlife.  This has led to us incorporating environmental issues into our activities programme to deliver important ecological messages of responsibility to an ever-increasing family audience. In 2016 Bowland AONB brought their Bowland Hay Time project to the festival and ran workshops, activities and discussions about the importance of wild meadows to support the animals and insects who inhabit our festival location.  These animals include wild birds and from that our Birds of Bowland Project began to take wings... So why a Hen Harrier? We wanted to make birds that are native to Bowland a focus for our festival this year and we needed to recruit someone to help promote this.  After research and discussions with the RSPB, Bowland AONB and Forestry Commission we realised that the Hen Harrier, although not alone on the endangered list, had the highest profile and its recent loss from the local area has gained the most notoriety.  Just the fact that there was a national project dedicated to the survival of this extremely rare and beautiful bird of prey made their profile even more attractive.  Threatened with extinction this bird has a national network of supporters who scour the skies and nesting locations hoping for a rare sighting of this bird.  The Hen Harrier whose Latin name means “circus” has a magical awe surrounding it, an almost mythical existence; and a festival, a temporary world of escapism seemed like the perfect place for a Hen Harrier to be spotted. We immediately commissioned local illustrator and sculptor Kerith Ogden to bring the Hen Harrier to Cloudspotting.  Our brief was to create an image which we could use throughout our promotional activities of the festival.  An image we could use with our logo but with a tribal imagery all of its own.  When we saw the initial drawings we were blown away by the grace and beauty of our bird and we needed to give her a name.  But it had to be the right name.  A few options were bounded about which included Hetty, Jen and even Rhythm (….is a sky dancer!) but the overall obvious choice was Bo.  Bo after our location, the beautiful Forest of Bowland and Boudicca another formidable female warrior.  Have you met Bo yet? Since then, Bo has become another member of the Cloudspotting team. Visually appealing, she has featured on all our promotional materials including flyers, posters, website, social media, banners etc.  Bo will also feature at the festival where we will reveal the second commission of Kerith, Bo the parade puppet lantern.  A huge 3D version of Bo with lights and a whopping flapping wingspan of 3.5m.  Bo will tour the festival site leading our rhythmical bird themed parade, dance the night away to our local reggae band Jeramiah Ferrari and finally take her nesting position in the Village Green for the remainder of the festival.  Learning through play Working in partnership with the RSPB and other activities/arts associates, our Birds of Bowland project has developed immensely to weave throughout our weekend activities programme.  Inclusive, engaging, educational and creative our arts package includes Bo and her other feathered friends involved in a variety of activities.  These include the opportunity to join the Cloudspotting Choir.  Rehearse throughout the weekend to perform Three Little Birds from the main stage on Sunday afternoon.  Join other crafters for regular knit’n’chirp sessions to knit your own Bo.  Leave the festival for a trek through the forest on our sculpture trail where you will discover 8ft bird; or be a part in the creation of a huge piece of community art adding colour to our huge canvas Bo.  These are just a few of the linked activities and workshops available; for more information please visit our activities page on our website . But our work with Bo doesn’t stop there.  We are so taken with Bo she will feature on artwork for future Cloudspotting events.  We have already been asked to tour Bo and the community developed artwork from the festival to regional galleries and libraries where we will produce narrative to support the images and continue to deliver the messages of the RSPB to support our local wildlife so that we can all live together, harmoniously in our modern world For more information about Cloudspotting Music and Arts Festival 2017, please have a look at our website or visit our facebook page.