Blog Post: Another shot hen harrier… how many more?

This is not the news I wanted to wake up to. Just weeks after the Crown Office discontinued a high-profile case against a former gamekeeper for the alleged illegal killing of a hen harrier despite clear video evidence, another hen harrier shooting has come to light. Police Scotland issued an appeal this morning, for information relating to the lethal shooting of a hen harrier near Leadhills, South Lanarkshire. You can read the response from RSPB Scotland here . Fortunately and exceptionally, “a number of witnesses” have apparently come forward but whether that’s enough to secure a prosecution remains to be seen. After all, if video evidence , clearly showing a hen harrier being shot out of the sky and its body retrieved by a man with his face in full view of the camera, isn’t enough to secure a conviction or even a court case, it’s hard to know what burden of proof is necessary. The message seems to be that those who wish to illegally kill our protected birds of prey can continue to do so with impunity, knowing that even if their alleged crimes are caught on film, they’re unlikely to be held to account. Still of film footage taken on Cabrach Estate, Morayshire in June 2013, showing a man removing the body of a recently shot hen harrier. Despite this, police are now appealing for CCTV evidence in this latest case. Anyone with any information at all should contact Police Scotland on 101. A hen harrier illegally shot and killed in 2013 and another in 2017... It goes without saying that any hen harrier shot is one too many but with four years between them, could these just be random isolated incidents? Not when you start filling in the blanks... January 2017 – hen harrier Carroll found dead in Northumberland of natural causes having previously survived being shot October 2016 – hen harrier Rowan found shot dead in Cumbria September 2015 – hen harrier Lad found with “injuries consistent with shooting ” in the Cairngorms April 2015 – hen harrier Annie found shot dead near Leadhills, South Lanarkshire June 2013 – video evidence recorded of a hen harrier being shot dead on Cabrach Estate, Morayshire, and a man retrieving the body June 2012  – hen harrier Bowland Betty found shot dead in the Yorkshire Dales Body of a young male hen harrier, Lad, found with "injuries consistent with shooting" just months after fledging. And that’s not to mention the number of satellite tagged hen harriers which have suddenly and unexpectedly disappeared – most notably in relation to recent events,  Chance , who vanished in May 2016, just a few miles from where Annie was found shot and near to where this most recent shooting has been witnessed. These are not isolated incidents. Collectively, they reveal a very clear picture of how protected birds of prey continue to be treated in some areas of our uplands, particularly where there is intensive grouse moor management. As I said in my last blog, our ability to uphold the law is only as good as our ability to enforce it and we are working hard to insist these issues be addressed by the public authorities as a matter of urgency. In the meantime, together with the Raptor Study Groups and wider conservation community, we will continue to monitor and protect our hen harriers wherever possible. Satellite tagging is providing an unprecedented window into this world and through the Hen Harrier LIFE Project, we plan to tag more hen harriers in 2017 than ever before. Whatever happens next, we will be watching. To follow the fortunes of our remaining satellite tagged hen harriers and find out more about our work to protect these stunning skydancers, visit www.rspb.org.uk or follow us @RSPB_Skydancer .    

Comment on Alleged hen harrier shooting case dropped

I am absolutely appalled at this decision. Someone in the criminal justice system has decided that the RSPB may not monitor raptor nest sites in Scotland, but if they do and detect criminality, that even viewing of a criminal act that this evidence can not be used in court. I have written to all my MSPs and although I was not able to be reasonable in my screed, I shall persist and if necessary meet each one to get a face to face response.  The organised criminal activity of driven grouse shooting has people in many places prepared to assist those who break the law, and the law needs to be changed to make this loophole closed to the organised criminals and their supporters. I shall draft a proposed change to the law to show how simple this would be. I believe that the RSPB should do the same. I would urge RSPB members in Scotland to contact their MSPs

Blog Post: Alleged hen harrier shooting case dropped

In case you missed it, RSPB have just published film footage of a former gamekeeper allegedly shooting a hen harrier on Cabrach Estate, Morayshire, in June 2013, retrieving the body, and cleaning up the feathers after himself. After almost four years of waiting, court proceedings were dropped two weeks ago by the Crown Office, who indicated that after considering all of the relevant material, they couldn't use RSPB Scotland video evidence to support the prosecution in court. However, it's only today that the Crown Office has explained the rationale behind this decision. Here' s the official response from RSPB Scotland: We do not agree with the opinion from the Crown Office that we were attempting to gather evidence for a prosecution. We installed a camera to monitor a protected breeding bird’s nest site, core business for a conservation organisation. We did not share the information about the nest site with anyone, as would be the case with any rare and vulnerable breeding bird species. The fact that an individual came and allegedly shot the female harrier, and that this was captured on film, was an incidental consequence of the camera’s deployment, in the same way that it could easily have captured footage of the nest being naturally predated or failing due to bad weather. It is very disappointing that the opportunity for the court to consider the issue of the admissibility or otherwise of this evidence, as has happened in previous cases, has been removed. Until today, we have received no rationale for the decision to drop the case despite the fact that a number of our staff have provided significant time and expertise in supporting the authorities with the prosecution case. Watch the footage for yourself here .  Full details in the original press release here .  We have now written to the Lord Advocate and are seeking urgent meetings with the Crown Office to consider the implications. Clearly the laws that protect our wildlife are only as good as our ability to uphold them.  If video footage of this quality isn't sufficient to secure a prosecution, then the question remains... what is?

Blog Post: Skydancer from Russia with love

The RSPB's Bowland Project Officer James Bray gives the lowdown on Bowland's special new visitor. RSPB staff and volunteers on the United Utilities estate in Bowland are out in the hills monitoring and protecting birds of prey every day of the week in all types of weather. We have been spending much of our time looking for returning hen harriers over the past few weeks in some rather un-spring-like weather so yesterday I was elated when I looked up and saw a mature male harrier skydancing low over my head. The bird disappeared out of sight down a gulley very quickly so I headed to a different position for a different view, happy that another male hen harrier was back on the estate. Over the next few hours the harrier was skydancing and hunting the slopes, mostly at very long range in a welcome bit of heat haze. I gradually got better and better views, and as the sun dropped a bit I began to strongly suspect that it was actually a pallid harrier. I called a good friend who was nearby and as we returned to the site the harrier flew low along the opposite hill giving superb views for the first time, allowing us to confirm that it was a mature male pallid harrier . Pallid harriers are rare visitors to the UK, most recently juvenile birds in the autumn. Adult males are exceptionally rare in the UK but one was seen near Hornsea in East Yorkshire early last Sunday morning and this is likely to be the same bird. Thanks must go to Mark Breaks for the photographs of this stunning bird. It’s not a hen harrier (the focus of my work), but I didn’t allow that to temper my excitement at having found a very beautiful and rare bird. We would like other birders to see this bird but must ask that people strictly follow the access arrangements as detailed below.   Access arrangements Please be aware that the pallid harrier is in a valley that is a four km walk from the nearest public parking. The walk is on a private road and vehicle access is only permitted for estate workers and the tenants that live and work here. BIRDERS MUST NOT  drive along this road, and will be asked to leave if they do.     Cars must only be parked in the pay and display car park in Dunsop Village at SD662502. The road to walk on is then accessed by walking west through the village (toward Lancaster and the Trough) over the river and take the first right. Follow this road north for approximately 3.5 kms up the Dunsop Valley until the road splits. Take the right hand split and walk for another 500 metres. The harrier has been hunting the slopes below the cairn on the hill on the other side of the river. Best views have been had from around the first cattle grid that you reach on this road after the split (approximately SD659543).   There are schedule 1 species nesting on the estate so it is vital that people coming to watch the harrier stick to the tracks so as not to cause disturbance at what is a really sensitive time in the breeding season. Please feel free to ask anyone that you see off the road to stick to the road!   We must also respect the goodwill of United Utilities, the land owner, as well as their tenants, who are incredibly supportive of our work so please stick rigorously to these access arrangements. There is a very nice cafe in Dunsop Village (Puddleducks) and there are toilets by the pay and display car park. Thank you, and good birding!

File: Hen Harrier Foodpass #4

With a long lens I was fortunate enough to witness this foodpass, high in the Antrim Hills. As he flies off, you can she she is still screaming at him, perhaps to encourage him to bring more food back quickly. Sadly this nest ended in disaster, when a Fox got the youngsters.

Blog Post: Guest Blog: Music on the Marr hen harrier t-shirt competition

Richard Johnstone is the organiser of the Music on the Marr folk festival, which takes place in Cumbria each summer. Here he tells us why the hen harrier has been chosen as the symbol of this year's festival and how the artistic amongst you could see your very own hen harrier design emblazoned across the chests of  hundreds of this year's festival goers.  Each year in late July, the lovely North Cumbrian village of Castle Carrock, nestled under the Geltsdale fells, hosts Music on the Marr, a three-day music festival showcasing outstanding folk and roots acts from near and far. The moors above the village partly comprise the RSPB's Geltsdale reserve, one of the very few recent breeding grounds of the hen harrier in Northern England. Each year the festival produces a new commemorative T-shirt and has on this occasion decided to feature the hen harrier, partly to raise awareness of its endangered state and partly to welcome it as a neighbour of our festival. The T-shirt design is open to public competition, and the winner will receive two weekend passes to the festival on 21-23rd July this year.  The competition is only open until Thursday 20th April though, so you'd better be quick! To read all the T&Cs and find out how to submit your entry, visit the Music on the Marr website here . A female hen harrier at RSPB's Geltsdale, in 2016. (Mark Thomas: rspb-images.com) This wonderful film shot at last year's event gives a flavour of the intimate and friendly nature of this event. Just as our area is visited by throngs of migrating birds at this time of year so the festival welcomes performers from such far flung places as the Congo, Zimbabwe and Senegal not to mention all parts of the UK. The festival's motto, which the village's road signs helpfully reflect is "Please Dance", but this year we'll be changing it to "Please Sky Dance" for obvious reasons! So please visit the festival website and, even if no designs spring to mind take a look at the impressive array of acts lined up and perhaps plan a visit combining the joys of fine folk music with the beauty of RSPB Geltsdale, and who knows? Maybe even a glimpse of an elusive hen harrier...

Blog Post: A new season & hopes for the class of 2017

It’s that time of year... hope and trepidation playing on my mind in equal measure. The breeding season just beginning, and with it, all the excitement and uncertainty of what lies ahead for our hen harriers. Often it feels as though little has changed from year to year, but our recent adventures in satellite tagging have given my reflections this year a new focus. For months now, our remaining satellite tagged birds have been sticking tightly to their chosen wintering grounds – Aalin in Shropshire, DeeCee in the Cairngorms, Finn in Ayrshire, Harriet in the Lake District, and Wendy on Mull. Who knows, perhaps that immobility has been the secret of their success? Being young and immature, it’s unlikely (though not impossible) that any of our young harriers will attempt to breed this year. But experience shows that won’t stop them seeking out and exploring potential breeding sites. It goes without saying we’ll be monitoring their every move, watching closely, and waiting... For my part, I’m simply grateful that they’ve managed to make it this far. Five hen harriers remaining out of 12 – I’m not going to lie, it’s been a rough six months... August 2016 - young Banffshire male, Elwood, the first of our hen harriers to be tagged last year disappeared in the Monadhliaths in August when his tag suddenly and inexplicably stopped transmitting – the same area that had recently become notorious for the disappearances of a number of satellite tracked golden eagles. Hearteningly, Elwood’s disappearance prompted the Scottish Minister for the Environment to include hen harriers in the Scottish Government’s review of satellite tracking data, alongside golden eagles and red kites. Young hen harrier, Elwood, shortly after having his satellite tag fitted. Image credit: Adam Fraser September 2016 - Brian, a young male from Perthshire, disappeared in the Cairngorms in when his tag suddenly and inexplicably stopped transmitting. His body was never found. October 2016 - Hermione, a young female from a late nest on the Isle of Mull, was sadly found dead of natural causes not far from her natal site. Her remains and satellite tag were both recovered. October 2016 – easily the most adventurous of all our harriers last year, Donald died of unknown causes in northern France after travelling there from West Argyll via the Isle of Man and Wales. It was not possible to recover his body. October 2016 – an adult female hen harrier is spotted at roost with a non-functioning tag and process of elimination suggests this could be 2014 Bowland bird, Highlander . November 2016 - Beater, another young male, who fledged from Wildlands Estate in the Cairngorms, disappeared in the central Scottish Borders and is thought to have died of unknown causes. His body hasn’t been found. Geltsdale hen harrier, Bonny, having his satellite tag fitted.   Image credit: Mark Thomas December 2016 – Bonny, our most famous hen harrier, who fledged from our Geltsdale reserve, had his name chosen by Chris Packham from a LUSH cosmetics competition, and featured on BBC’s Autumnwatch and Six News, disappeared and is thought to have died of unknown causes on moorland to the east of Geltsdale in December 2016. His body hasn’t been found. January 2017 – the body of young female, Carroll, named after raptor worker Mick Carroll, was reported to the police by a Northumberland estate after being found dead of a natural causes (full post-mortem report awaited). Both body and tag were recovered and it was later discovered that she had survived being shot at a young age. Radiograph of hen harrier, Carroll, showing two pieces of lead shot lodged in her knee and head. Image credit: Zoological Society of London Add to that list the outcome of Natural England’s 2016 hen harriers – the confirmed shooting of Rowan in Cumbria, and the unexplained disappearances of Tarras in the Peak District and Mick in the Yorkshire Dales, (the remaining two, John and Sorrell, are still alive) and it becomes increasingly difficult not to despair. The confirmed shootings of Rowan and Carroll, in 2016, add to the shooting of Lad , in September 2015, and Annie in April 2015, to make four hen harriers confirmed shot in separate incidents (two in England, two in Scotland), in less than two years, with zero prosecutions or hope of prosecution. The illegal killing of our protected birds of prey is not a conspiracy theory, nor a cynical attempt to blacken the name of a certain group of people. It is a documented fact. Hen harrier, Lad, found shot dead in the Cairngorms National Park in 2015. Image credit: RSPB And it is thanks to satellite tagging that we are able to document this fact and shine a light on what is happening to our hen harriers. As the possible rediscovery of Highlander shows, satellite tagging is not a perfect technology (I challenge you to name one that is) but for those wishing to discredit it, I suggest you read this excellent blog by my colleague and experienced satellite tagger, Duncan Orr-Ewing. From natural deaths, to incredible journeys, breeding successes and failures, suspicious disappearances, and illegal killings, satellite tagging is helping us to build a picture of our hen harrier population, which otherwise would remain hidden from view. And the more tags we fit, the more rounded that picture will become. When we started the Hen Harrier LIFE Project, we anticipated fitting around 6 tags per year to hen harriers in England and Scotland – 24 or so in total. In the first year of the project, that is what we did. What we couldn’t have predicted, however, was the subsequent groundswell of public support for this sort of work and thanks to the generosity of LUSH cosmetics and their customers through sales of the Skydancer bathbomb, we were able to double the number of tags fitted last year to 12, and plan to more than double this again for 2017. I titled this blog “A new season and hope for the class of 2017” and I meant it. In the face of everything, I am hopeful for 2017. I am hopeful for every year that passes but I am especially hopeful, this year, for the stories that I know are lying in wait for so many satellite tagged hen harriers to reveal to us. So here's to the breeding season - we're ready for all that it may bring.  --- In the meantime, what can you do?  Last chance to join this Thunderclap started by Findlay Wilde ( @WildeAboutBirds) , before 11am today and add your voice to thousands on social media calling for an end to hen harrier persecution. You can also join Fin's campaign by including the hashtag #henharriers in all your tweets today. What better way to mark the start of the hen harrier breeding season than to get #henharriers trending on Twitter?  If you see a hen harrier in England , phone our Hen Harrier Hotline on 0845 4600121 (calls charged at local rates) or email henharriers@rspb.org.uk. Details of the date, time, location (six-figure grid reference if possible), and activity of the bird (eg flying, hunting, skydancing) could help us pinpoint an early breeding attempt.  If you see a hen harrier in Scotland , phone the Partnership Against Wildlife crime (PAW) Scotland's   Heads Up for Harriers hotline on 07767 671973 (calls charged at standard network rates) or email henharrier@snh.gov.uk. 

Blog Post: Hen Harrier Hotline relaunched

  As spring has now almost sprung, we’ve relaunched our Hen Harrier Hotline with the hope of finding out where these seriously threatened birds of prey might be breeding in England’s moorland.   If you are out hiking or cycling in the hills, please keep an eye out for one. If you are lucky enough to see a hen harrier, please get in touch.    The Harrier Hotline number is 0845 4600121 (calls charged at local rate) .  Reports can also be e-mailed to henharriers@rspb.org.uk.  Reports of sightings should include the date and location of sighting, with a six-figure grid reference where possible. A description of the bird’s behaviour would also be useful.   Many of you will be able to spot a hen harrier half a mile away in poor weather conditions. But for those of you who are less familiar with the bird of prey, here is a reminder of what they look like.   Male hen harriers are an ash-grey colour with black wing tips and a wingspan of just less than a metre. They are sometimes known as ghostbirds because of the pale colour of their plumage.   Male hen harrier - RSPB Images Female hen harriers are slightly larger, are owl-like in appearance, and have a mottled brown plumage, which camouflages them when they nest on the ground. They have horizontal stripes on their tails, giving them the nickname ringtail and a patch of white just above, on the rump.   Female hen harrier - Dave Dimmock

Blog Post: Making bath bombs with Chris Packham

Hen Harrier Life Project Community Engagement Officer Aimée Nicholson reports on recent the LUSH summit   Since joining the Hen Harrier Life Project back in October of last year, I have spent many a happy day telling people about the wonderful birds we are working so hard to protect. Last Thursday was no different but there was a slight twist to this event; this time it was live streamed across the internet for the world to see. The event I attended was the LUSH Summit, a two-day event organised by the ethical cosmetics company, which showcased the causes that they support through the campaigns in their shops. The Hen Harrier Life Project is very lucky to be one of those causes and since 2015 the sales from the Skydancer bath bomb has raised over £100,000 to fund the purchase of satellite tags. Thanks to this support from Lush we are able to tag double the amount of birds this year than we did last year, all due to people buying bath bombs. My day started at 6am as I got on the train to head to the trendy Tobacco Dock in London’s thriving enterprise zone.  I am not usually an early morning person but the excitement of attending this event and talking about hen harriers alongside my colleague Mark Thomas and Chris Packham had me wide awake and prepared for the day. I arrived in London just as is started to snow, battled the rush hour tube (how do people do this?) and made it to the event with half an hour to spare, and time to warm up ready for our rehearsal. We were hosted in the conservation room which was filled with trees, plants and cosy bean bags for people to relax in during the talks. The talks in this room were enough to keep you busy for the day never mind the numerous other rooms which were available to explore.  The LUSH Summit I met with Chris and Mark at rehearsal ready to be briefed about what we were doing that afternoon, the session we were taking part in was done in the LUSH Kitchen style (think Saturday Kitchen with cosmetics) so we were told that we would be talking about hen harriers whilst making the Skydancer bath bomb.  For someone who loves the bath bomb, this sounded great fun. Aimée with Mark Thomas and Chris Packham The summit was just as I had imagined, very LUSH! The place smelled incredible; you could actually smell it on the way to the venue and we were entertained with dancing flowers, ladybirds and unicorns whilst exploring all the new and exclusive products that were scattered throughout the venue. This was the only LUSH Kitchen talk to be live streamed throughout the whole event which highlights the importance of this campaign. We sat awaiting the countdown and looked around at the crowded room of expectant faces and then we were live! The LUSH kitchen format was great fun to take part in; there was time for us to tell people about hen harriers, the problems they face,  the work, which LUSH has done to support the Hen Harrier Life Project, all whilst getting messy making  Skydancer bath bombs. Making hen harrier bath bombs The 40 minutes whizzed by and it all went incredibly well, which what you always hope for as a Community Engagement Officer, and the feedback in the room was that of a very caring audience who hope for the best future for hen harriers. Here’s to hoping that the people in audience, and those watching online, went away and told others about these beautiful Skydancers and what they can do to help. After saying my goodbyes to the team I headed back to Kings Cross, Skydancers in hand, backpack full of goodies and smelling like I had been rolling in essential oils. I felt content that now even more people were aware of the work of the Hen Harrier Life Project, the amazing support we have received from LUSH and hoping for a successful breeding season in 2017.          

Blog Post: Introducing Aimée

New(ish) RSPB recruit Aimée Nicholson talks about her work as Community Engagement Officer in England for the Hen Harrier Life Project. I have been working for the Hen Harrier Life Project for a little while now so I thought it was about time I introduced myself to you all. My role involves working with communities in and around the Special Protection Areas in England that are designated to have breeding hen harriers living in them. These are the North Pennine Moors and the Forest of Bowland. This work involves school outreach sessions in primary and secondary schools, as well as working with game keeping students, giving community talks and attending country shows in the summer. The role has me travelling around a lot and last week took me across to the University of Cumbria in Ambleside where I was giving a seminar on hen harriers and the uplands. I presented to a group of current students, prospective students, parents and the local University of the Third Age group so there was a large audience of keen listeners. The engagement with the seminar was excellent and there were some very insightful and thoughtful issues raised, as well as a real willingness by a number of the students to get further involved in hen harrier conservation. This is the part of the job that is so rewarding; inspiring young naturalists is so important for the future of conservation. This was our second visit to the University of Cumbria in a number of months and hopefully all the enthusiasm of those I spoke to is currently spreading its way across the Lake District. If you live in and around the hen harrier Special Protection Areas and are interested in booking a community talk, school outreach session, lecture, seminar or workshop please get in touch by emailing me at aimee.nicholson@rspb.org.uk .  

Comment on Chilling out on winter roost watch duty in Bowland

There may be little or no nesting Hen Harriers or Peregrines in Bowland any more but I don't suppose that will bother the senior people in Natural England, DEFRA or the moor owners in the area, as it is all part of the masterplan for conserving Hen Harriers by removing them from the North. It is just a pity that NE have not told the Hen Harriers of the plan, because they will keep coming from the rest of the country to the Bowland killing fields. I trust the RSPB will keep satellite tagging them in Scotland and England to keep embarrassing the government and the Hawk and Owl Trust.

Blog Post: Chilling out on winter roost watch duty in Bowland

The RSPB’s Bowland Project Officer James Bray reports on the highs and lows of monitoring hen harrier winter roosts  I’m back home now with a cup of hot chocolate in front of the fire and I can reflect on a lovely evening sitting on top of a cold hill somewhere in the Forest of Bowland. In the background Ingleborough (a hill on the west side of the Yorkshire Dales National Park) was snow-capped and glowed beautiful shades of apricot and pink as the sun set, and to top it all off I picked up a lone hen harrier coming in to roost. The Forest of Bowland is probably best known for the healthy population of breeding hen harriers that used to breed here. This importance is recognised by national and international legal protection with the Bowland Fells, designated as a Special Protection Area for 13 pairs of hen harriers. The breeding population has declined dramatically, to the point where only three pairs have bred successfully in the last five years, and this is reflected in the very low numbers of harriers that roost around Bowland in the winter now. There is still plentiful habitat for wintering (and breeding) hen harriers around Bowland. They hunt over rough grassland and moorland for voles and small birds (they can catch birds up to the size of snipe and fieldfare), and in winter spend the night roosting in large dense patches of rushes where they find shelter from the weather and can hide from foxes. However, illegal persecution has driven the population of hen harriers in England to near oblivion and if we are to protect our breeding population we also need to protect the wintering birds locally.  The satellite tagging of hen harriers has revealed that female harriers winter very close to where they were born and breed, so I spend much of the winter months monitoring winter roosts, helped by a very dedicated team of volunteers. Friends who have monitored birds of prey in Bowland for decades tell me stories of watching up to a dozen harriers using a single roost, back when hen harriers were more common in Bowland and the rest of northern England. With the crash in numbers in Bowland our roosts are very quiet now, and I am lucky if I see more than a lone bird. When I arrive at the position where I’m going to watch from I will find a sheltered spot out of the wind and out of sight of inquisitive eyes and will then spend over two hours watching the roost. I find that I quickly get very cold so often and end up wearing close to ten layers in an effort to keep warm. This can make standing up at the end of the roost watch rather challenging but at least it provides lots of opportunity for colleagues to tease me about my soft southern roots. Whatever the temperature it is a magical time of day to be out, as I get the chance to watch the change over between the day shift and the night shift. Shy or nocturnal species are waking up and emerging to forage and daytime species are heading to roost. Distant wisps of smoke turn into huge flocks of starlings flying to roost somewhere to the west of Bowland, and my attention will be drawn by chacking calls to flocks of fieldfares flying in to the rush beds to roost for the night. I sometimes see sika and roe deer emerge from cover, as well as woodcock flying out from woodland onto the pastures to forage overnight. If I’m very lucky the ghostly form of a barn owl will float silently past. As the winter months have passed my thoughts are turning increasingly towards the upcoming breeding season. With hen harriers, peregrines and other large birds of prey still being illegally killed in northern England and southern Scotland, we have our work cut out for us trying to protect these fantastic species from local extinction.

Comment on Carroll – a Northumberland bird to the very end

I'd like to add my thanks the estate which reported the bird. Clearly there are estates which are prepared to act responsibly. If their voices could be heard in the organisations who represent estates, then perhaps we could start to get somewhere. It is so sad that the 2016 English reared harriers are having such a torrid time, but it makes it harder to conceal the truth.