Blog Post: Guest blog: Hen Harrier at RSPB Wallasea Island

  Andrew Armstrong is a wildlife photographer local to RSPB's Wallasea Wetlands reserve. Andrew’s stunning hen harrier photographs first came to our attention on Twitter where he posts under @drumon25. Impressed by his passion for the birds which clearly shines through his photography, we invited him to share what it feels like to capture these rare glimpses into the private life of one of our most spectacular birds of prey.  As a wildlife photographer I have been visiting RSPB Wallasea Island for three years, predominantly in the winter when the raptors congregate over the site. Marsh Harrier, Buzzard, Peregrine, Merlin and especially Short Eared Owls show really well during the winter, making for wonderful photography opportunities. The real prize is getting the opportunity to watch, and hopefully photograph, the Hen Harriers as they overwinter here. Over the two previous years I have had infrequent sightings of this marvellous raptor (both male and female) and was only able to get distant images. This year has been incredible on the island as there has been up to three female Hen Harriers and one male all quartering. I have had success with getting images of the female Hen Harriers but the male has proven more cautious, quartering away from the newly opened footpaths. The habitat dynamics on the island offer excellent overwintering feeding options for a whole host of passerines. The winter bird crop cover areas have proved more than useful quartering locations for the Hen Harriers and I have been fortunate enough to witness several successful hunts. There is nothing quite like watching a Hen Harrier gliding just above the top of the winter bird crop cover, constantly adjusting and occasionally suddenly diving onto prey. I have seen the females predating mostly small mammals until recently whilst the male looks to be working the passerine flocks. On the occasion I took the images of the male Hen Harrier, he had been quartering the wild bird cover as usual. He is incredibly methodical in his approach and would periodically hover over areas in an attempt to flush any prey. Large flocks of passerines, mostly Corn Buntings, would scatter in panic as he quartered past. As he moved through an area he suddenly re-positioned and dropped onto prey. He remained on the ground for about 15 minutes, which tends to suggest he may have been successful. It was a real privilege to have this fleeting insight into the lives of these incredible birds.  If you're lucky enough to see a hen harrier, please let us know by contacting the Hen Harrier Hotline on 0845 4600121 (calls charged at local rates) or email henharriers@rspb.org.uk. Information on the date, time, location (6-figure grid reference if possible), description of the bird, and what it was doing (eg hunting, flying over, skydancing, roosting) will help us to keep track of these birds and direct our on the ground conservation efforts.